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The Humanities Conference 2003

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Presentation Details

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Indigenous Rights in North America: International Law and the Cree of Northern Quebec and the Navajo of the Southwestern United States

David Harding.


The application of international human rights agreements is normally associated with developing countries and not established democracies such as Canada and the United States. Over the past three decades however, numerous North American indigenous peoples have sought recourse through such agreements. In particular, the Cree of Northern Quebec and the Navajo of the southwestern United States have attemped to use international venues to seek redress to perceived violations of their rights. In particular, both peoples are seeking to address land claims issues involved with resource exploitation: hydroelectric power in the case of the Cree, and coal and uranium in the case of the Navajo. The basis of their claims under international law, the results to date, and prospects for the future will be discussed.

Presenters

David Harding  (Denmark)
External Associate Profesor
Department of English Faculty of Humanities
Aarhus University

David Harding is a PhD student in the field of Native American Studies, examining the self-detrmination building process of the Cree of Northern Quebec and the Navajo of the southwestern United States.

Keywords
  • Aboriginal rights
  • First Nations
  • Native Americans



(30 min Conference Paper, English)